The app also claims that UFCW 1400 promoted the petition on its social media sites, and was signed on picket lines organized by the union. UFCW 1400 President Norm Neault denied that the union had anything to do with the creation of the petition, along with Thebaud. United Food and Commercial Workers Canada (UFCW), Local 1400 Members working at Richardson Milling in Martensville, Sask., voted in favour of a new collective agreement on June 6. “Together, we have managed not to overcome many of the concessions proposed by employers, including the elimination of sick periods, longer waiting times for short-term disability benefits, the abolition of the overtime bank, significant cuts in bereavement, benefits and emergency leave. At the end of the negotiations, the members were able to retain all their benefits without concessions,” said Norm Neault, UFCW, Local 1400 President. The new agreement provides for wage increases of 2.75 per cent in years 1, 3 and 5 of the contract and 2.5 per cent in years 2 and 4. In addition, members receive improvements to the start-up allowance and the seniority clause has been extended, according to the union. This is the WEBSITE of UFCW 1400 in Saskatchewan. For more information about UFCW Canada, please visit our national website under www.ufcw.ca UFCW 1400 called for strike action for Saskatoon Co-op employees to protest the board`s insistence on introducing a second lower level of pay for new employees in any new collective agreement. The November 8 request for unfair labour practice accuses UFCW 1400 and Craig Thebaud – the man who launched the petition – of violating the Saskatchewan Employment Act by negotiating in bad faith by creating and promoting the petition. The website was designed to cater to the 1,400 local members, easy enough to understand and navigate, but complex enough to catch your eye and want to come back interesting enough for you. Daniel Burke, a Saskatoon Co-op lawyer who prepared the motion, asked the House to immediately issue UFCW 1400 and Thebaud to preserve any communication they had between them, as well as any contributions, photos, messages or comments that were made on the petition. “Co-op members are not satisfied with how Co-op has worked and the way they have tried to treat their employees,” he said.

Thebaud said his faction, Saskatoon Co-op Members for Fair Treatment of Employees, had collected more than 300 signatures needed. However, they wait to collect more before submitting it if they are deemed invalid.