The conference will take the form of regular and frequent meetings between the British and Irish ministers to promote cooperation between the two governments at all levels. On issues that are not left to Northern Ireland, the Irish Government may present positions and proposals. All decisions of the Conference shall be taken by mutual agreement between the two Governments and the two Governments agree to make determined efforts to resolve disputes between them. London`s direct rule ended in Northern Ireland when power officially left the new Northern Ireland Assembly, the North-South Council of Ministers and the Anglo-Irish Council, when the first regulations relating to the Anglo-Irish Agreement entered into force on 2 December 1999. [15] [16] [17] In accordance with Article 4(2) of the Anglo-Irish Agreement (Agreement between the British and Irish Governments for the implementation of the Belfast Agreement), the two governments must inform each other in writing of compliance with the conditions for the entry into force of the Anglo-Irish Agreement. entry into force should take place upon receipt of those two notifications. [18] The British government agreed to participate in a televised ceremony at Iveagh House in Dublin, the Irish Foreign Office. Peter Mandelson, Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, took part very early on 2 December 1999. He spoke with David Andrews, the Irish Foreign Secretary. Shortly after the ceremony, at 10.30am, the Taoiseach, Bertie Ahern, signed the declaration of formal amendment to Articles 2 and 3 of the Irish Constitution.

He then announced to Dáil the entry into force of the Anglo-Irish Agreement (including certain supplementary agreements to the Belfast Agreement). [7] [19] The agreement reaffirmed its commitment to “mutual respect, civil rights and religious freedoms for all in the community.” The multi-party agreement recognised “the importance of respect, understanding and tolerance with regard to linguistic diversity”, in particular with regard to the Irish language, the Ulster Scots and the languages of other ethnic minorities in Northern Ireland, “all of which are part of the cultural richness of the island of Ireland”. The Belfast Agreement is also called the Good Friday Agreement, since it was reached on Good Friday, 10 April 1998. It was an agreement between the British and Irish governments and most of Northern Ireland`s political parties on how to govern Northern Ireland. The discussions that led to the agreement focused on issues that have led to conflicts in recent decades. The aim was to create a new decentralised government for Northern Ireland, in which unionists and nationalists would share power. The agreement was reached between the British and Irish governments and eight political parties or groups in Northern Ireland. Three were representative of unionism: the Ulster Unionist Party, which had led Unionism in Ulster since the early twentieth century, and two smaller parties linked to loyalist paramilitaries, the Progressive Unionist Party (associated with the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) and the Ulster Democratic Party (the political wing of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA)). Two of them have generally been described as nationalists: the Social Democratic and Labour Party and Sinn Féin, the Republican Party associated with the Commissional Irish Republican Army.

[4] [5] Regardless of these rival traditions, there were two other rallying parties, the Inter-municipal Alliance Party and the Northern Ireland Women`s Coalition. . . .