We`ve all seen them – confidentiality agreements with provisions that say something like, “The confidentiality obligations set out therein are valid one (one) year after the disclosure of confidential information.” On the surface, provisions like this seem useful, since they set the end of a company`s legal obligations under the agreement. This can be correct in many cases. But if trade secrets are leaked as part of the deal, these provisions are traps for the unwary. Here`s the problem: Valuable information can be protected forever as a trade secret – as long as the owner continues to make reasonable efforts to keep the information confidential. Some States consider confidentiality agreements, without a certain duration, to be inappropriate trade restrictions when they apply to information which, although confidential, does not reach the level of a trade secret under the legislation in force. . . .